• Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon

© 2019 Duval County Public Schools

Rumor vs. Fact

RUMOR

FACT

Schools will lose funding for PE and Art in the 2018-2019 school year.​

Duval County Public School Superintendent Dr. Diana Greene will recommend that funding for arts, music and physical education resources be maintained at its current level in the budget recommendation for the upcoming school year.

Duval County Public Schools has career and technical education programs in ALL of our high schools and in 22 of our 29 middle schools. More than 20,000 of our middle and high school students are enrolled in CTE programs.

RUMOR

FACT

Duval County Public Schools does not offer Career and Technical Education.

Duval County Public Schools has career and technical education programs in ALL of our high schools and in 22 of our 29 middle schools. More than 20,000 of our middle and high school students are enrolled in CTE programs.

RUMOR

FACT

School Safety Assistants are nothing more than armed security guards.

School Safety Assistants receive a total of 200 hours of training from the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office and the Duval County School Police Department before placement on a school campus. ​To be an armed security guard in Florida requires only 68 hours of training. ​Additionally, the training required to be a Duval County Public Schools school safety assistant exceeds requirements of state law by 56 hours.​​To be selected as a school safety assistant, an applicant must also pass a background check, psychological examination, drug test, polygraph test and interview before entering training.

RUMOR

FACT

School nurses are not in Duval County Public Schools.

Each Duval County Public School is supported with a Registered Nurse (RN) who visits the school once per week on average. One of the many functions of these RNs is to train Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) at the school to provide basic school health services, including but not limited to medication administration, care for sick or injured students, and health screenings. UAPs are sometimes referred to as school nurses or clinic attendants because they cover the primary responsibilities associated with the health room/clinic at their respective schools. Some district schools do have additional RNs and/or LPNs (Licensed Practical Nurses)  who serve medically fragile students with chronic health conditions requiring advanced nursing skills ordered by a physician.